Kyaw Moe Oo's story



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Kyaw Moe Oo is an EFN Fellowship grantee studying in Asian Institute of Technology.
© Kyaw Moe Oo
Myanmar is home to some of the most biologically diverse landscapes on earth. But as the world’s second most vulnerable country to climate change, it faces environmental challenges more complex than ever before – challenges that require advanced skills and knowledge to tackle. Unfortunately, access to higher education is still limited in Myanmar, preventing many committed conservationists from reaching their potential.
WWF knows that investing in training and education is critical for biodiversity conservation. Our Education for Nature (EFN) program provides fellowships to rising leaders to pursue advanced degrees in conservation-related fields and conduct research in their home countries.

EFN fellowships support future conservation leaders like Kyaw Moe Oo, who is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management at the Asian Institute of Technology.

“I always knew I wanted to study aquaculture, but without the EFN fellowship I could not have afforded to study abroad. The fellowship has enabled me to pursue my studies in a subject that I’m interested in,” he said.

When he completes his studies, Kyaw Moe Oo will return to Myanmar, where he aspires to work in mangrove forest conservation and share his knowledge about aquaculture practices.

“Mangrove forest conservation is vital for climate change mitigation, as mangroves absorb more carbon dioxide than other forests,” he said. “People in coastal regions don’t have access to advanced aquaculture technology so they continue using traditional practices, which can have a damaging impact on mangroves. I want to help introduce mangrove friendly aquaculture technology to Myanmar and make a difference to local people’s livelihoods.”

By helping conservationists like Kyaw Moe Oo access improved education opportunities, EFN is building the next generation of conservation leaders committed to protecting Myanmar’s most biologically diverse places.

Find out more about EFN fellowships here.

I always knew I wanted to study aquaculture, but without the EFN fellowship I could not have afforded to study abroad. The fellowship has enabled me to pursue my studies in a subject that I’m interested in.

Kyaw Moe Oo, EFN Fellow